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Showing posts from April, 2011

Recommended Reading - 2011

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Here is my most updated list of Recommended Readings. I’ve broken them down into general categories and listed them alphabetically by author’s last name.  Without a doubt, I’ve missed a few and I’m sure some are bound to raise an eyebrow.
LITERATUREI'm Not Scared by Ammaniti, NiccolòFahrenheit 451 by Bradbury, RayA Clockwork Orange by Burgess, AnthonyThe Awakening by Chopin, KateThe Good Earth by Buck, Pearl S.The Souls of Black Folk by DuBois, W.E.B. The Count of Monte Cristo by Dumas, AlexandreThe Three Musketeers by Dumas, AlexandreInvisible Man by Ellison, RalphBeowulf translated by Seamus HeaneyBartleby and Benito Cereno by Melville, HermanThe Odyssey by Homer The Iliad by HomerBrave New World by Huxley, AldousThe Metamorphosis by Kafka, FranzThe Poisonwood Bible by Kingsolver, BarbaraTo Kill a Mockingbird by Lee, Harper Mary Reilly by Martin, ValerieBeloved by Morrison, ToniLolita by Nabokov, VladimirAnimal Farm  by Orwell, George1984 by Orwell, GeorgeThe Bell Jar by Plath, S…

Freeway Flyer Blog Post

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Scheduling Classes and Learning to Cry on the Inside“I’m sorry, I can’t teach that class.”  Now, I say this in a calm and mature tone.  But in my head, I’m screaming, kicking, and pouting like the five-year-old I know. I really am.  Recently, I was offered the chance to teach a course at a college I hadn’t taught at yet.  It was not the standard introductory course many adjuncts are stuck with after full-time faculty choose the crème-de-la-crème; it was one within my specialty.

For the rest of this blog, check out this Adjunct Nation.


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Sound Judgment: An Audies Judge Reflects

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My sidebar write up in Library Journal about being a judge for the Audies.

While many of my teen peers were making mixtapes, I was popping audiobooks like potato chips. In 2003, during my first official audiobook-reviewing stint, for the now-defunct AudiobookCafe.com, the managing editor there invited me to apply to become a judge for the Audies. Naturally, I jumped at the chance.


Having now judged the competition every year since—in categories including adaptation, audio drama, sf, classics, and humor—I have seen firsthand the effect that the growth of the audiobook industry has had on judging criteria and procedure as well as the ways in which it has shaped the nature of the competition overall.
For the full article, visit Library Journal


Did you enjoy this read? Let me know your thoughts down below or feel free to browse around andcheck out some of my other posts!. You might also want to keep up to date with my blog bysigning up for them via email.

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Behind the Mike: Simon Jones

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My interview with Simon Jones in Library Journal:With over 30 years of film, radio, television, and theater experience, Simon Jones (www.simonjonesinfo.com) has moved many an audience with his clear, distinct, British-accented voice and often deadpan delivery. An audiobook narrator since 1986, he has recorded over 60 titles, many of them Audie Award nominees and one—Mitch Cullin’s A Slight Trick of the Mind (HighBridge Audio, 2005)—a winner of that award. Among his most recent recordings are Daniel Ariely’s The Upside of Irrationality (HarperAudio) and Robert Harris’s Conspirata (S. & S. Audio), both released in 2010.



Eaton:  What have been your favorite audios to record to date?
Jones:  Jonathan Stroud’s “Bartimaeus” books: The Amulet of Samarkand, The Golem’s Eye, Ptolemy’s Gate, and [the prequel to that trilogy,] The Ring of Solomon (Listening Library, 2004–10). I have really enjoyed relishing the role of Bartimaeus, evil demon extraordinaire. Stroud has created a fa…

Freeway Flyer Blog Post

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Digitalizing the Freeway FlyerRecently, I listened to the audiobook of Chris Anderson’s “Free:  The Future of Radical Price” for free.  The premise is that behind the digital revolution is the mass amplification of cheap goods and services to be offered will increase and what people will get is the most basic model; if they want a more specialized version, they will have to pay.  Anderson expands upon this in a variety of ways, but that’s the gist.   This has me thinking about the uses and benefits of digital freebies as it relates to the classroom and the Freeway Flyer.

Too read more, check out the full post here!


Did you enjoy this read? Let me know your thoughts down below or feel free to browse around andcheck out some of my other posts!. You might also want to keep up to date with my blog bysigning up for them via email.

This work is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.