Showing posts with label Lovecraft. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Lovecraft. Show all posts

Monday, September 19, 2016

Short Story #403: A Collapse of Horses by Brian Evenson

Title: A Collapse of Horses

Author:  Brian Evenson

Summary:

Years Best Dark Fantasy and Horror 2014 Book Cover
The narrator informs the reader that he is in all likelihood, the last survivor of his family and that no one could have survived the fire.  He then goes on to explain what happened.  He first introduces an experience of wandering the countryside and coming upon four horses lying upon the ground, apparently dead.  Yet, their presumable owner still seeks to fill their trough and the narrator is baffled by this action wondering if the man cannot see if they are dead, chooses to ignore that they are dead, or knows something about their state of living (or unliving) that the narrator does not.  From here, the narrator provides the briefest of backgrounds about growing up, getting educated, starting a family and eventually falling out of love with his wife until an accident at work breaks his skull and sets him down a path of confusion.  From here, the question of sanity rises again and again as he insists on noticing a variety of odd things about the house they live in.  Things are moves and changes just slightly from day to day and he seems to be the only one to know it.  More frustratingly, he can't seem to know whether he has three children or four.  Some days, it's three and others, it's four.  He must try different tactics to determine how many.  Of course, all of these changes cause him to act stranger and stranger, so his family alienates him more and more.  He takes to going for long walks, believing that the house may be the evil behind all of this but it's during these long walks that he encounters the four horses.  This scene proves so stressful that he begins to stop going for long walks for fear that he will see it again.  He ruminates how the fear in his life is dominated by house and horse (a 1-letter difference between the two).  Eventually, he decides he needs to face the horses but can never seem to find them again, which leads him to burn the house down.  In the end, he tries to explain that he knows this is exactly what happened and that the person who he is talking to should stop claiming to be his wife, he knows she is dead.  

Reflection

Overall, I liked how one had to question every part of this story.  All the substantive parts are up for question.  Did he ever come across the horses?  Did he ever have a family?  Did he kill his family?  Is he now in a prison or asylum?  It's all up for grabs.  Beyond this, the dreamlike sequences that Evenson designs to feel like we, are phasing in and out of consciousness with this tale is also quite enjoyable.  But I also like the profound existential angst by the narrator, witnessing four horses possibly dead and a man still filling the trough to be such an intriguing and halting image.  The futility and the curiosity of the situation mingle together and Evenson makes a strong case about how it could profoundly alter one's sanity to a degree. I had found the story recommended a few times in different places and am glad I took the time to read it.  It makes me think I will be reading more by Evenson in the future.

Rating:  4 (out of 5 stars)

Source: The Year's Best Dark Fantasy and Horror, 2014 edited by Paula Guran.  However, you can also find the story 
offered here at The American Reader.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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Monday, September 5, 2016

Short Story #401: Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and His Family

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The story begins by explaining the Arthur Jermyn went down to the water and set himself afire after exploring the object of a box that had been delivered.  The story then steps back and explains the family legacy of which Jermyn belongs.  His great-great-great grandfather, Sir Wade Jermyn was among the first to explore the Congo and thus, many of the men in his family followed along this line.  In his adventures, Wade reportedly married a Portuguese trader's daughter who appeared to be quick sickly and remained secluded during any time in England.  However, she does accompany him on his expeditions into the Congo and eventually dies there.  However, they do conceive a boy that Wade brings home and raises as his own.  Upon his return from the last voyage, a madness emerges from Wade that eventually land him in a madhouse to which he is partially thankful for.  His son, Philip also proves strange and after marrying and producing an heir, Robert, disappears into Congo.  Robert takes up studying the artifacts of his grandfather (Wade) from Africa.  His obsession is only disrupted by three children, two of whom are never seen because of supposed deformities and the third son, Nevil, who runs away, gets married, has a child, and loses his wife.  Meanwhile, Robert gets news from an explorer who tells him of a city of white apes  in the Congo and other unknown details.  After this meeting, Robert goes on a killing rampage, wherein he kills the explore and his son, before he was subdued.  With Nevil dead, and Robert put away, Alfred, Nevil's son is the heir at four years old.  When he grew up, Alfred eventually joined a circus and sought to train the circus ape, which eventually killed him.  Alfred's son, Arthur was raised by his mother in the Jermyn household.  After his mother's death, he too becomes intrigued by the Congo and sells a part of his estate to make it there.  Once there, the locals confirm the different stories he had heard about this family and the place over the years, including the city of apes.  They even tell of a hybrid creature of an ape-princess and a white god.  Later, Arthur comes across the city that Wade had said to have discovered but did not discover much else.  He returned home to wait for additional relics and objects to be sent to him by natives and other explorers.  However,  one day, he does receive a box that Arthur opens and discovers that all his blood line between himself and Wade were the offspring of an ape and his Wade.  It's at this point, he sets himself on fire.  

Reflection

Overall, the story is well composed.  I began to assume that there was some kind of cross-breeding going on, once the story of a city of apes appeared but Lovecraft does well with giving the ending first and then winding the tale toward that end.  I'm ambivalent about the actual content of the story--humans and apes in African mating--it laden with racial overtones, which is pretty common for Lovecraft and that idea that the only acceptable decision when one finds out that they are of mixed-breed is to utterly destroy one's self (or in Robert's case, kill one's family members) leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

Rating:  2 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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Monday, August 29, 2016

Short Story #400: What The Moon Brings by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: What The Moon Brings

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The narrator declares that he hates the moon and what it brings with its weird lighting.  He then describes a beautiful landscape of garden, woods and ocean that he regularly enjoys during the summer but that has been entirely changed when the moon comes out.  What was once magical and alluring turns decrepit and ugly.   In particular, as he watches the ocean take the tide out he sees increasingly uglier things, until the rescinding sea begins to reveal a city of the dead with horrible and evil things that are enough to drive him mad.  He promptly sticks his head into the water and drowns himself, letting the worms feast on his corpse.  



Reflection

Another rather short story of Lovecraft, this one seems to go to bad real quick.  The beginning reminded me of Jack London's "Moon-Face" in some ways--just in the way the character seems to have an indescribable hatred of the moon and goes into describing such a beautiful landscape.  That the moon reveals the city of the dead was a great feature, but then the narrator's prompt suicide feels like a bit of a dodge by Lovecraft.  The end comes in a few short sentences without the typically mad-descent that I've come to enjoy by Lovecraft.

Rating:  2 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Short Story #399: The History of the Necronomicon by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The History of the Necronomicon

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The title says it all, this piece traces the history of the creation of and reproduction of the Necronomicon (also known as Al Azif) from its original creation by Abdul Alhazred, "a mad poet" to where the modern copies exist.  The narrator explains that the book came about when Alhazred visits certain dark places like the ruins of  Babylon and Memphis as well as spending ten years in the Arabian desert.  He finally settled in Damascus to write the book.  He then moves into explaining how different translations escaped, what some of the differences were and where the most current versions sit.  Interestingly, the narrative part finishes on discussing how R. W. Chambers (a real author) was supposedly influenced by the rumors of the book when he wrote The King in Yellow (which talks about a fictional play in book form).  The story then finished with a straight chronology of century changes for the book.  

Reflection

I'm not sure you can call this a short story, but it is a publication of Lovecraft and it seems to provide a clearer sense of where the Necronomicon came from for readers (and probably Lovecraft himself) to keep in their minds as it appeared in different texts throughout his work.  

Rating:  2 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, August 15, 2016

Short Story #398: The Silver Key by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Silver Key 

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
This story returns to Randolph Carter, a character who shows up or is mentioend in other stories.  In thsi story, years have passed since Carter "lost the key of the gate of dreams."  He spends years trying to come to terms with this and accepting the commonness of everyday life, but it increasingly is challenging and he looks for ways to touch the world of wonder.  He tries many things like traditional faith, travelling, and even embracing the present world, but nothing seems to stick.  He returns to writing and though successful, he rejects his success as a writer as a sign of being common.  As Carter becomes old, he slips further and further into recollecting on his past rather than deal with the dull present life.  As he descends into his own dreams, he begins to recall family members who have been long dead and he dreams of his grandfather telling him of a silver key that had been passed down through the family but had not been open for centuries.  Carter realizes that he will be able to get back to the world dreams if he can find the key.  His dreams and contemplations continue to show him clues and eventually, he visits his family's ancestral home, believing he will find the key.  When he arrives, he is greeted by Benijah, the servant of his uncle and over 100 years old.  Benijah greets Randall as if he were still a boy.  This disorients Carter, calling him back to his childhood and recalling more memories of things about the home.  Benijah's spell leads Carter to go into the house, have dinner, and go to bed. But the next day, he wanders out into the surrounding land to a cave that he navigates through to find the silver key.  He returns home shortly after this.  The story breaks to explain that Carter's distant relatives speak of how Carter changed in his tenth year and became something of a prophet.  They talk of his ability to say things that later on panned out to be true.  They talk of such things because Carter has disappeared.  His servant reports him last being seen when driving out to his old home after finding a key in the house.  The narrator explains that people are interested in splitting up his estate because they believe Carter dead, but the narrator believes him to still be alive.  He seems to know that Carter is in a different realm, a realm of dream.  He also believes that he will be visiting Carter in a dream-city and hopes to see the silver key.

Reflection

I found the story a little hard to get into, but enjoyable in the reread.  I forgot what had last happened to Carter so it was slow in getting into the story and the first half does wax and wane a bit without much meat.  It feels like several pages of Carter rejecting the real world.  However, the slipping back and forth into his own dreams, making it sometimes hard to determine if he is in dream or in the real world was more exciting and (pun intended) spell-binding.  Seeing that so many characters appear and disappear in Lovecraft tales, I would love to see an infographic connecting all the different characters, gods, species, and places.

Rating:  3 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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Monday, August 8, 2016

Short Story #397: The Outsider by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Outsider

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The narrator explains that he had lived in a strange castle for as long as he can remember and lived by himself.  The castle is surrounded by a dark forest that never seems to end and sunlight never penetrates the forest to shine upon the castle.  He wonders about the types of people that lived here previously and finds himself lonely.  He regularly thinks about the one dark tower that raises up high enough that he cannot see the top of it.  One day, he decides to climb it and slowly makes his way up inside the toward.  He eventually finds there are no stairs but he must scale the walls inside in order to move up.  He eventually finds a ceiling with a trap-door to climb though.  After briefly resting from utter exhaustion, he explores the room where appears to be some kind of storage room.  He eventually finds his way outside where he is showered in moonlight.  As he explores outside, he realizes that he is on solid ground--not high in the sky, but on regular earth.  Baffled and confused, he continues to explore the surrounding area and eventually wanders to find a place where people live.  He decides to get closer to hear and observe them. He decides to enter and when he does, all chaos breaks loose.  Screaming and yelling break out and the narrator is confused by the cacophony until he thinks he sees something that they are scared of.  He slowly approaches what he describes to be a distorted and horrific monster and in a moment of recognition flees and returns to his underground castle, never to return for the monster he saw was his own reflection.  

Reflection

I may have read this story before, but it is still a fantastic tale and one of Lovecraft's best.  There's a bit of Frankenstein in it.  The description and misdirects were well executed in this tale and that we walk through the story in the mind of the monster is also a great twist--though there are hints all along that this is the case.  The most fascinating part of the story is the description of his underground world and how he spends his days.

Rating:  4 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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Monday, July 18, 2016

Short Story #394: The Tree by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Tree

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The story begins with identifying a strange olive tree and tomb that sits upon Mount Maenalus in Arcadia that seems strange.  The effect of this tree and tomb causes many people to avoid the place and rumor tells that it is a regularly visited by Pan.  The narrator then delves into its history.  It started with two sculptors, Kalos and Musides, who were known throughout for their amazing work and enduring friendship. Eventually, the Tyrant of Syracuse enlists both of them to create an inspiring statue for him.  Since the two were not competitive they relied upon one another to inform and shape their work.  However, Musides soon becomes depressed and it is revealed that his depression is because Kalos was ill.  Kalos's illness continues and Musides is continually distracted and tries to give comfort.  As he gets weaker, he requests to be brought to the olive grove to be left alone.  This is disheartening to Musides but he still helps in getting him there.  As his demise approaches, he requests that the twigs of the olive tree in this particular grove be planted near his head when he dies.  Musides does exactly that and also creates a beautiful statue alongside his grave.  With the tragedy passed, Musides returns to the sculpture for the Tyrant and focuses all of his emotions upon it.  A few years pass and a fully-fledged olive tree has grown out of the twigs.  He finishes the statue and requests for the Tyrant to come and take it.  However, the night before the arrival, a hard storm wreaks havoc and eventually destroyed the hall wherein Musides had worked, though it seems more like the strange olive tree growing out of Kalos's grave did most of the damage.  Musides had entirely disappeared.  With the statue destroyed, people leave and largely avoid the area from then on.

Reflection

It seems like this was an attempt at myth by Lovecraft.  It feels more like myth-making than horror.  Placing it in Greece and in ancient times certain helps as does the reference to Pan, but the structure of the story seems to be missing something--such as what drove the illness of Kalos and what happened to Musides.  It seems like he's trying to tell a story of the old days in the method of old folklore but it doesn't seem to carry through. 

Rating:  2 (out of 5 stars)

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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Monday, July 11, 2016

Short Story #393: The Street by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Street

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The narrator explains that though we know living things to have souls, there is still some speculation about an inanimate object, but the story that follows is meant to raise that question further.  The narrator explains that there was a street that became the first home of settlers from Europe, where they set up their cabins and rallied to fight the Indians.  The story tells all about its flourishing developments and prospering as the United States became a more prosperous place.  From log-cabins to houses with a paved road and signs of modernity, the street becomes a place to admire  However, slowly new immigrants began to penetrate the street and these people brought with them strange tongues and traditions.  Their presence begins to bring down the value and importance of the street.  Worse, they begin to plot the overthrow of the country and wish to do harm to those who have made the country great.  On the eve of their assault, the street rebels and brings down all the houses with the men in them, leaving very few if any alive in them.


Reflection

And here where is where Lovecraft shows his true stripes as xenophobic bigot.  The tale seems focused largely on the spread of communism at the end, but is a crudely hidden rant about the "foreigner" and how they are going to undo the prestige and power of the Anglo-Saxon tradition.  

Rating:  1 (out of 5 stars)

Source:  I read this version  of a the complete works of H. P. Lovecraft from Red Skull Publishing (that's their book cover too).  However, you can find all of H. P. Lovecraft's work for free at this website.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, July 4, 2016

Short Story #392: The White Ship by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The White Ship

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The nameless narrator talks about his legacy as a light-house operator and how his grandfather, his father, and he have been operating it over the years.  However, the ships are far and few in his day.  Yet, there is a white ship that regularly crossed the horizon every so often.  He also explains that he is lured to the ocean by its secrets and what it reveals to him.  One night, he sees the white ship and a bearded man on deck invites him upon the ship from afar.  The narrator doesn't take the offer initially, but eventually journeys out to the ship and together they follow a bird to magical and haunting lands until their settle at the Land of Sona-Nyl, a wondrous place where people are content.  But the narrator isn't content and wishes to seek out the land of Cathuria, where the gods live.  He insists on going there and the bearded man warns him increasingly that no one returns from such a place so one can never be sure just what awaits them.  They follow the bird again back out into the sea and travel for days before encountering signs that they are approaching Cathuria.  However, when they arrive where they believe it is, the ship is torn asunder and the bearded man explains to the narrator that he has abandoned Land of Sona-Nyl for a place that is exclusive to the gods and he cannot get there.  As the ship tears apart, the man finds himself in utter darkness, awakening to be back on the lighthouse, the same night he left, but the light has gone out and the white ship on the water has crashed.  The next day, he searches for ship remains and only finds a rare but dead bird.


Reflection

Many of these types of stories wherein the narrator takes a trip to the fantastic, remind me very much of Robert Howard (creator of Conan series) and the earlier writers of fantasy.  They provide these compelling and curious broad strokes about these fantasy worlds that are both simple and yet clearly indicate the author has craft a rich conception of the worlds that they are merely hinting at.  Lovecraft does this with his evil gods and horror stories, but I'm increasing fascinated with how he does this with his fantasy stories.  It makes me wonder of all the worlds he did create and how much more we could have gotten to explore them if he lived longer than a few decades.

Rating:  4 (out of 5 stars)

Source:  I read this version  of a the complete works of H. P. Lovecraft from Red Skull Publishing (that's their book cover too).  However, you can find all of H. P. Lovecraft's work for free at this website.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Short Story #391: Ex-Oblivion by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: Ex-Oblivion

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The narrator explains that he is completely bored and disinterested with the common life and has pursued the world of dreams by taking opium to keep him in the fascinating worlds of dream longer and longer.  While exploring, he comes across a barrier--a wall that he cannot cross.  He keeps looking for ways to surpass it but doesn't seem to know how to get into it.  Finally, in a dream city, he stumbles upon the information needed to know how to enter the world beyond the wall, where he believes there is an even richer world of dreams.  The answer lies in taking a strong drug, which upon waking he finds and consumes.  This time, he approaches the gate in the wall and it is open and he steps through.  He enters a pure empty oblivion and feels he has finally come home.


Reflection

A  curious tale by Lovecraft where tragedy or horror appear to not be the end goal but rather moving into a type of nirvana.  I kept expecting the end to come with him finding himself in a demon's pit or something.  There's a surprising serenity of this tale that is rarely seen in his work.

Rating:  3 (out of 5 stars)


Source:  I read this version  of a the complete works of H. P. Lovecraft from Red Skull Publishing (that's their book cover too).  However, you can find all of H. P. Lovecraft's work for free at this website.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Short Story #390: The Thing in the Moonlight by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Thing in the Moonlight

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The story introduces Morgan, who is described as someone without much literary skill and challenged with English but the narrator explains that he has written a very strange manuscript in perfect English.  The manuscript tells of a man named Howard Phillips who finds himself trapped in a dream that he cannot escape.  In the dream, he finds himself in a marsh and eventually makes his way to a town that has a trolley cart.  He gets onto the cart when he finally sees two beings in the distance.  As they get closer, he believes they are the conductor and engineer, but one leaps to all fours and begins to chase after him while the other has a disfigured face.  He runs away and keeps running, eventually exhausted.  When he reawakens within the dream, he wanders about and finds himself back in the same place with the figures howling.  It continues to happen and he worries when he will go mad.  The story ends by the narrator saying that he fears ever visiting the address listed in the story to see what would be waiting for him. 

Reflection

Apparently this isn't entirely a Lovecraft story.  It was a letter written to Donald Wandrei about aa dream by Lovecraft but J. Chapman Wiske gave it the framing device (Morgan and the narrator) and published it after his death.  It's a curious tale that reminds me of something along the lines of Nightmare on Elm Street.

Rating:  3 (out of 5 stars)


Source:  I read this version  of a the complete works of H. P. Lovecraft from Red Skull Publishing (that's their book cover too).  However, you can find all of H. P. Lovecraft's work for free at this website.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


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By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Short Story #389: The Doom that Came to Sarnath by H. P. Lovecraft

Title: The Doom that Came to Sarnath

Author:  H. P. Lovecraft

Summary:

Book cover to H. P. Lovecraft: The Complete Collection with Accompanying Facts from Red Skull Publishing
The story explains that Sarnath sits upon a large lake that has no streams or rivers attached to it.  Near Sarnath, there once stood a city called Ib, which was inhabited by strange alien creatures said to have come from the moon worshiped the great water-lizard god, Bokrug.  In the early days of man, men eventually came to the lake and established Sarnath and after some time, feeling hatred for the strange creatures of Ib, they slaughtered them wholesale, dumped their bodies in the lake, and destroyed the city, only keeping a strange statue of Bokgrug.  The night after the assault the statue disappears that the high priest guarding it is found dead, having scratched out "doom" before dying.  Centuries pass and Sarnath becomes a the center of a great empire and trading routes.  On the 1000th anniversary of the sacking of Ib--something celebrated annually--they have a great festival, inviting nobility from all around.  Much time and money is put into this event and many rare foods are prepared for the king's feast, including large fish from the lake.  As the party approaches midnight, the high priests observe a strange mist rising from lake and things descending from the moon to meet the mist along with a strange light.  They quickly flee and then, chaos breaks out as the princess and royalty at the feast flee the palace in complete and utter madness, which scares the rest of the population into fleeing as well out of the city and into night, never to return.  In the palace, the strange creatures of Ib had returned and reclaimed the city.  Long afterward, when men braved to revisit Sarnath, they found that all signs of the great city were completely destroyed and all that was left was  marshlands.  The one remnant that was discovered was the statue of Bokrug, which eventually became the god of worship throughout the lands.  


Reflection

It's not a surprising story--as soon as the slaughter happens and we see "doom" scrawled by the priest, we know that is what is to come, so it's more a matter of time.  It's also an interesting tale by Lovecraft as it contains no actual characters and isn't a first-person narrative.  Instead, the beauty of this story lies in the descriptions.  He pays ample attention to talking about how the city grew, its size, its layout, its habits.  Thus, the city contains most of the attention and detail and it seems that Lovecraft just wants to reader to ponder the idea of vastness of the past and the strange ways civilizations have risen and fallen long before we ever existed.  

Rating:  3 (out of 5 stars)


Source:  I read this version  of a the complete works of H. P. Lovecraft from Red Skull Publishing (that's their book cover too).  However, you can find all of H. P. Lovecraft's work for free at this website.  

For a full listing of all the short stories in this series, check out the category 365 Short Stories a year.


Creative Commons License
By Any Other Nerd Blog by Lance Eaton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.